Kenilworth professor's 'outstanding' cell biology research to be recognised with award

Prof Andrew McAinsh. Photo: British Society for Cell Biology
Prof Andrew McAinsh. Photo: British Society for Cell Biology

A Kenilworth professor's 'outstanding' contributions to the field of cell biology will be recognised with a special award.

Andrew McAinsh, a professor of cell biology at Warwick Medical School, will receive the British Society for Cell Biology’s (BSCB) prestigious Hooke Medal for his work over the past 20 years.

The Hooke Medal is awarded every year by the BSCB and recognises an emerging leader in the field.

Prof McAinsh said: "I am honoured to receive this award for the work I have done so far.

"Discovering how cells operate at the molecular level is fascinating, and also essential, if we are to understand how defects in cell function lead to human disease.

"I am also really grateful to all the students and researchers from my lab, and the wonderful collaborators and colleagues who have shared ideas and supported my work.

"I am, however, most excited by the fact that there are still so many more questions than answers when it comes to the inner workings of a cell."

Prof McAinsh's work focuses on how chromosomes,the molecules that contain our genetic information, are correctly separated into the two new cells after a cell divides.

Mistakes in this process are associated with the progression of cancer, miscarriage, and developmental syndromes such as Down's. Understanding the process better could help stop these from happening.

In particular, his lab have explored the workings of a nano-scale molecular machine called the kinetochore, which helps chromosomes move inside the cell.

Prof McAinsh will be presented with the Hooke Medal in March at the annual spring meeting of the BSCB in Manchester.

BSCB President, Professor Ann Ridley said: “I am delighted that Andrew is the recipient of the BSCB Hooke medal for 2018. The Hooke medal was established to recognise an outstanding early to mid-career cell biologist each year.

“Andrew was chosen from many excellent candidates for his seminal contributions to cell biology over his career so far. I look forward to presenting the medal to him."