Kenilworth man to auction more than 25 classic tractors

Barry Jones
Barry Jones

A 77-year-old Kenilworth man is set to auction his lifetime collection of historic tractors and classic cars.

More than 25 classic tractors as well as a Rolls Royce Silver Wraith and 40-year-old Triumph Stag are going under the hammer.

The collection of rural memorabilia belongs to Barry Jones, who bought his first tractor when he was 15 years old.

The auction will take place at 10am on Saturday September 7 at The Meadows, Dale House Lane in Kenilworth,

Barry said: “My dad had a small holding in the Clun Valley in Shropshire in the 1950s and made hay the old-fashioned way with a pitchfork so he was against me buying a tractor.

"I was young and keen and didn’t take any notice and bought my first tractor, a Standard Fordson, for about £15.”

This original tractor from the 1940s is amongst many other collectable items from Britain’s rural heritage up for bidding.

Over the years Barry’s eclectic collection of agricultural bygones has grown to include many horse-drawn implements and farm tools too which would not look out of place in a heritage centre.

Barry said the oldest item for sale is a wooden yoke.

He added: “I bought the yoke from a car boot sale in Stoneleigh when my partner was away in Devon. It is made of wood with two chains either side and would have been used by traditional milkmaids to carry milk many years ago, so I had to add it to my collection.”

As well as agricultural bygones, Barry is putting his collection of vintage toys and models and his classic cars up for auction.

Barry said: “Some of the cars, like the Vanden Plas Princess were impulse purchases, I found that one for sale by the side of the road in its original condition. I bought the Rolls Royce Silver Wraith when I was thinking of running a wedding car business and it’s still in the same condition.”

The vehicles and machinery in the auction will appeal to anyone wishing to buy a piece of Britain’s rural history or looking for a restoration project.

Barry added: “The collection has taken over 60 years to put together and the time is right to pass it on to people who will appreciate it as much as I have, and hopefully pass it on to the next generation.”