Leamington history group member’s map brings home the heartache of the First World War

Pre pic for forthcoming History Fair.  Dick Fisk has put together a map showing where all the Leamington men who died in WW1 lived. NNL-140810-020551009
Pre pic for forthcoming History Fair. Dick Fisk has put together a map showing where all the Leamington men who died in WW1 lived. NNL-140810-020551009
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Months of work and miles of walking has resulted in a map which graphically shows how the death and devastation of war was brought home to the streets of Leamington.

Streets are pinpointed to mark houses where a loved one was killed during the First World War.

And on some streets there are row after row of markers to show houses where news of a the death was delivered by telegram or by letter from a commanding officer.

On Queen Street, families suffered up to 19 deaths, on Court Street up to 13, and around 10 families on Brook Street.

While on Albion Row (now demolished), one family suffered the devastation of four brothers killed.

The map is the work of Dick Fisk, of Lillington, a member of the Leamington History Group.

Mr Fisk, aged 71, had inspiration for the map one day when he was looking at the names on Leamington War 
Memorial in Euston Place.

He said: “The French mark war cemeteries on the Michelin maps with mauve dots, and that gave me the idea.”

And as part of his research he walked along every street where it is marked with death.

He said: “It shows how much heartache was brought to the streets of Leamington. There were 44 sets of brothers killed.

“I knew there was going to be a lot, but this map really brings it home. Everyone must have known someone who died in the war – dads, brothers, uncles, sons, nephews and friends”

He said there were more than 500 marked houses on the 1923 publication map.

Barry Franklin, chairman of the history group, said: “Dick did this on his own initiative before he was a member of the history group – it’s wonderful.

“When you show it to schools it will really bring home to people the depths of devastation and heartache suffered.”

The Leamington History Group has an active programme of events and has a Tuesday drop-in session from 10am until noon at South Lodge, opposite the Royal Pump Rooms, where items of interest can be brought.

Its annual Local History Fair at the conference centre next to St Peter’s Catholic Church, Dormer Place, is on October 18, from 10am-4pm. It involves other history groups and there will be a sale of second-hand history and topography books.

Go to www.leamingtonhistory.co.uk